31 Days of “Little Known” FACTS — For Breast Cancer Awareness Month — Day 15 — Toxic “Forever Chemicals” in Pink Post-It Notes May Increase Breast Cancer Risk

Did you know…

PFAS are called “forever chemicals” because they don’t break down, and evidence shows that even very low levels of PFAS exposure is not safe for human health.

Please consider joining Breast Cancer Action in their campaign to call out corporate giant 3M for pinkwashing while continuing to produce and use toxic PFAS. 3M says their pink products are a “reminder of a good cause” even though their toxic “forever chemicals” may increase the risk of breast cancer. This hypocrisy is called pinkwashing.

Read Kara Kenan’s story. She was exposed to toxic PFAS for much of her life and diagnosed with breast cancer at age 35.

Please consider this easy way to take action — Tell 3M to stop producing, using, and selling PFAS!

Thank you Breast Cancer Action for making a difference with your mission, vision and values

About Donna Pinto

I was born and raised in New Jersey and moved to the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles when I was 12. I graduated with a BA in Journalism/Advertising from San Diego State University. After a short stint in magazine ad sales in LA, I was offered my dream job working for Club Med. I spent two years working at resorts in Mexico, The Bahamas, The Dominican Republic and Colorado. My husband Glenn & I met while working at Club Med in Ixtapa, Mexico. We returned to "real life/jobs" for three years before we embarked on a two year honeymoon around the world. Together we wrote a book called "When The Travel Bug Bites: Creative Ways to Earn, Save and Stay Abroad." I am also the author of "Cheatnotes on Life: Lessons From The Classroom of Life," a quote book for new graduates. Becoming a mom changed my life and I was fortunate to work part-time from home with many amazing nonprofits. In 2010, a DCIS diagnosis inspired me to an investigation that culminated in creating DCIS 411 and Give Wellness.
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